Julie Appleby

Julie Appleby reports on the implementation of the health care overhaul law, the interplay of health care treatments and costs, trends in health insurance, and policy issues affecting hospitals and other medical providers. Her KHN stories have appeared in USA Today, the Washington Post, the Philadelphia Inquirer and MSNBC, among others. Before joining KHN in March 2009, Appleby spent 10 years on the health care industry and policy beat for USA Today. She also worked at the San Francisco Chronicle, the Financial Times in London and the Contra Costa Times in Walnut Creek, Calif. She serves on the board of the Association of Health Care Journalists and her education includes a Master of Public Health degree. | Contact: JulieA@kff.org | @Julie_Appleby
  • Health Insurance: How Much More Should Older People Pay?

    Maria Bishop, age 60, pays $500 a month for health insurance. Chris Denny, 27, pays $117. In most states, insurers can charge older customers far more than younger ones. As Congress wrestles with a health care overhaul, lawmakers are debating new limits that could narrow the difference.

    Aug 31, 2009

  • Checking In With Ascension Health, Largest Catholic Health System

    With 66 general hospitals, cancer centers, home services, clinics and nursing homes, Ascension Health is an important player in the U.S. health care system. President and CEO Anthony Tersigni has a message for Washington lawmakers: "We want to make sure we keep the agenda on the right focus - caring for all in this country."

    Aug 18, 2009

  • Five Lessons From Seattle On Adopting Electronic Medical Records

    In Seattle, three major hospital systems have sophisticated electronic medical records, one of the many goals of health reform. But the systems can’t talk to each other. Overcoming the obstacles will take 'federal will and money.'

    Aug 10, 2009

  • Checking In With Health Insurers' Chief Lobbyist Karen Ignagni

    In just the last few weeks, Karen Ignagni, the health industry’s chief lobbyist, has faced Democratic accusations that insurers are "villains" and "immoral." In an interview with KHN, Ignagni discussed her take on the Democratic political assault, her industry’s end-game strategy and her unflagging opposition to a public plan.

    Aug 06, 2009

  • Checking In With Health Insurers' Chief Lobbyist Karen Ignagni

    In just the last few weeks, Karen Ignagni, the health industry’s chief lobbyist, has faced Democratic accusations that insurers are "villains" and "immoral." In an interview with KHN, Ignagni discussed her take on the Democratic political assault, her industry’s end-game strategy and her unflagging opposition to a public plan.

    Aug 06, 2009

  • Lawmakers To Insurers: 'Pony Up' For Health Reform

    As Senate Democrats scramble to finance an ambitious health care overhaul, they're exploring ways to get extract money from the insurance industry, including taxing very costly policies. They're also considering tacking a fee onto every new policy sold as a result of health reform or a flat tax on insurer profits.

    Jul 24, 2009

  • For Many Workers, Insurance Choices May be Limited

    President Obama and leading Democrats have stressed that people who like their employer-sponsored insurance would be able to keep it, under a health care overhaul. But they haven't emphasized the flip side: That people who don't like their coverage might have to keep it.

    Jul 15, 2009

  • What's An Exchange?

    While advocates say insurance exchanges would stimulate price competition and give consumers new choices, there's also a risk these programs could undermine the employer-based health insurance system. Here are nine questions and answers about exchanges and their role in health reform.

    Jul 10, 2009

  • Exchanges May Play Key Role In An Overhauled Health System

    Insurance exchanges are a critical part of proposed health system overhaul legislation. They could transform how insurance is sold. But experts warn that without the right structure and rules, exchanges could undermine the employer-based insurance system.

    Jul 10, 2009

  • The $64,000 Question: Can Health Care Be Paid For Without Breaking the Bank?

    Democrats in Congress, surprised by the high cost estimates for their health care proposals, are looking at a wide range of options for raising money and reducing costs. Some of the revenue raisers have been rejected in previous years, but now all ideas are on the table because of the big amounts needed to pay for a health care overhaul.

    Jun 22, 2009