Most People Buying On Exchanges Were Uninsured, Survey Finds

Nearly six in 10 people buying their own health insurance through health law exchanges were previously uninsured -- most for at least two years, according to a new survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation that looks at the experiences of those most affected by the law. (Kaiser Health News is an editorial independent project of the foundation.)

The Wall Street Journal: Poll: Nearly 60% Of Exchange Enrollees Were Uninsured
Almost six in 10 people who bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act’s online exchanges had been uninsured just before they went shopping for a health plan, according to a new survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation. The finding offers another glimpse at whether the 2010 law achieved its main goal: to reduce the number of uninsured people in the U.S., which was around 45 million before the law’s passage (Radnofsky, 6/19). 

The New York Times: Health Exchange Enrollees Had Mostly Been Uninsured
Four in 10 people enrolling in health plans through the new insurance exchanges already had insurance, but six in 10 were previously uninsured, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey released Thursday. Most of the uninsured had been without coverage for two years or more, and 45 percent said they had been without coverage for at least five years, the foundation said in a report about people in the individual insurance market (Pear, 6/19). 

Los Angeles Times: Most With Obamacare Were Previously Uninsured, New Survey Finds
About 4.5 million of the 8 million Americans who signed up for health insurance on marketplaces created by the new federal healthcare law did not previously have insurance, according to a national survey that provides the most detailed look to date at who enrolled for coverage under the Affordable Care Act this year (Levey, 6/19). 

Kaiser Health News: Survey: Most People Buying On Insurance Exchanges Were Uninsured
Nearly six in 10 Americans who bought insurance for this year through the health law’s online marketplaces were previously uninsured—most for at least two years, according to a new survey that looks at the experiences of those most affected by the law. That finding is higher than some earlier estimates, and counters arguments made by critics of the law that most of those who purchased the new policies were previously insured (Appleby, 6/19).

The Washington Post: Most Obamacare Exchange Enrollees Were Previously Uninsured, Survey Finds
About six in 10 people who bought their own health insurance through Affordable Care Act exchanges were previously uninsured, according to a new survey providing one of the first comprehensive looks at the insurance landscape after the health care law's first open enrollment period (Millman, 6/19). 

The Fiscal Times: New Poll Shows More Uninsured Get Coverage
The main goal of the president’s health care law is to expand access to coverage to the millions of uninsured Americans—and according to a new survey of Obamacare enrollees—it may be achieving that goal. Nearly six in 10 people-or 4.5 million—who signed up for Obamacare were previously uninsured, a new Kaiser Family Foundation survey found. The majority of these people said they had gone without coverage for at least two years and nearly 70 percent said they decided to buy insurance because of the law, while a little over a quarter said they would have gotten it anyway (Ehley, 6/19).

CQ Healthbeat:  Most Exchange Plan Buyers Had Been Uninsured, Study Shows
The majority of people who bought insurance through health law exchanges were previously uninsured, according to a study that honed in on the experiences of people who purchased plans in the individual market. The study is the first of series planned by the Kaiser Family Foundation designed to answer some common questions about who was enrolling through the exchanges. These state and federal web-based programs are a defining feature of the implementation of the 2010 health law (Young, 6/19).

Meanwhile, another analysis looks at the cost of the new plans -

CBS News: For Some, Obamacare Delivers ‚Äč"Sticker Shock"
Is health insurance bought through Obamacare really as affordable as it could be, or are prices higher than what was available before the federal program took effect in January? At least for some Americans, new research suggests, Obamacare is delivering a hefty dose of sticker shock. According to a working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, insurance premiums rose from about 14 percent before the Affordable Care Act was implemented to as high as 28 percent post-Obamacare for plans bought in California and states using federally run insurance marketplaces. Those figures are before tax credits, it's worth noting (Picchi, 6/19).  

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