With Eyes On Upcoming Congressional Elections, Democrats See Glimmer Of Hope In Enrollment Numbers

For months, Republicans have viewed the health law as a powerful weapon against Democratic opponents, but the better-than-expected enrollment figures offered Democrats a positive counter-argument. Meanwhile, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, continues to voice dissatisfaction with his own "Obamacare" health policy.   

The New York Times: Health Enrollment Numbers Lift Democratic Hopes
After months of pummeling by Republicans and with a grim election season approaching, Democrats on Tuesday had a rare bright day. President Obama’s announcement that the new health care plan had enrolled 7.1 million Americans coincided with the release by Representative Paul D. Ryan of a new Republican budget that proposes changes in Medicare and deep cuts in spending (Weisman, 4/2).

Reuters: Obamacare Numbers Offer Glimmer Of Hope For Democrats In Elections
A rare burst of good news on President Barack Obama's healthcare program has given Democrats their first glimmer of hope in months on an issue that has helped drag the party down ahead of November's U.S. congressional elections. A better-than-expected enrollment of 7.1 million people in healthcare exchanges under Obamacare gives Democrats a positive argument to counter relentless Republican calls for repeal of the law, and could help them change the topic to the bread-and-butter economic and job issues Democrats prefer to talk about (Whitesides and Morgan, 4/2).

ABC News: Boehner Complains That Obamacare Tripled His Co-Pay
While President Obama heralds the more than 7 million health insurance signups through the Affordable Care Act, House Speaker John Boehner made it clear today he’s still ticked off about his own insurance rates going up. “I can give you hundreds of letters from my constituents who have been harmed by this law. My insurance premiums nearly doubled. My co-pays and deductibles tripled under ‘Obamacare,’” the Ohio Republican said today. Boehner has lamented his own insurance rates previously, which were forced to change along with other older government workers when the existing federal employee healthcare system moved to the District of Columbia’s new exchange, which was mandated by president’s signature law (Larotonda, 4/2).

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