Policy Developments: SCOTUS Won't Hear Appeal Of Ruling Striking Down Okla. Abortion Law

The Supreme Court won't hear an appeal of a ruling striking down an Oklahoma abortion law that would have required pregnant women to have an ultrasound before having an abortion. In the meantime, The Washington Post fact-checks an insurance premium claim by HHS Secretary Sebelius. 

Los Angeles Times: Supreme Court Decision Disappoints Abortion Foes
For the second week in a row, the Supreme Court let stand a ruling that strikes down a major abortion regulation from Oklahoma, disappointing abortion foes who had hoped conservative justices would impose new limits on a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy. The justices Tuesday turned down Oklahoma's appeal seeking to revive a law that would have required pregnant women to undergo an ultrasound and hear about the fetus' size and possible heartbeat (Savage, 11/12).

The Washington Post's The Fact Checker: Sebelius's Claim That Insurance Premiums Are 16 Percent Lower Than CBO Projected
Estimates from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office are considered the gold standard in Washington. The budget impact of every bill voted on by Congress is calculated by CBO analysts -- and their findings often make a difference in whether legislation passes or not. That’s why politicians often tout CBO’s estimates. So we were curious last week when Secretary Sebelius cited a CBO projection of insurance rates -- and how actual premiums turned out to be lower than expected. What’s the source of this factoid? (Kessler, 11/13).

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