Study: Almost Half Of Psychiatrists Don't Accept Health Insurance

The findings were published yesterday in JAMA Psychiatry.

Reuters: Psychiatrists Less Likely To Take Insurance Than Others
Psychiatrists in the U.S. are less likely to accept insurance than other types of doctors, according to a new study. Researchers found only about half of psychiatrists accepted private insurance between 2009 and 2010, compared to almost 90 percent of doctors in other specialties (Seaman, 12/11).

The New York Times: Fewer Psychiatrists Seen Taking Health Insurance
The lead author of the study, Dr. Tara F. Bishop of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, said: “In the wake of the school killings in Newtown, Conn., and other recent mass shootings, the need for increased mental health services is now recognized. But unless patients have deep pockets, they may have a hard time finding a psychiatrist who will treat them.” Mental health care is one of 10 types of “essential health benefits” that must be provided by insurers under the new health care law (Pear, 12/11).

This is part of Kaiser Health News' Daily Report - a summary of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The full summary of the day's news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.