Judge Rules Morning-After Pill Must Be Available Over The Counter For All Ages

The ruling came in response to a lawsuit brought by reproductive-rights groups.

The New York Times: Judge Orders Morning-After Pill Available For All Ages
A federal judge has ruled that the United States government must make the most common morning-after pill available over the counter for all ages, instead of requiring a prescription for girls 16 and under (Belluck, 4/5).

Reuters: Judge Strikes Restrictions On 'Morning-After' Pill
The ruling by U.S. District Judge Edward Korman in Brooklyn, New York, comes in a lawsuit brought by reproductive-rights groups, which had sought to remove age and other restrictions on emergency contraception (4/5).

Politico Pro: Court: No Age Limit On OTC Emergency Contraception
The ruling is a blow to President Barack Obama and HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, both of whom support restricting OTC access to "morning after pills" for anyone under age 17. Younger women had required a prescription (Smith, 4/5).

CBS News: Judge Strikes Age Restrictions For 'Morning-After' Pill
In 2011 the Food and Drug Administration had been prepared to lift a controversial age limit and make Plan B One-Step. ... Plan B was being sold only with a prescription to those 17 and older showing an ID with proof of age. But in December of that year Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius blocked the move. ... Sebelius said that while young girls are physically capable of bearing children, they might not properly understand how to use the emergency contraception without guidance from an adult (4/5).

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