Preventive Mammogram Recommendations Could Result In Missed Cancer, Study Says

A new study has found that U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations that women over 50 get mammograms only every two years -- instead of every year -- could result in missed breast cancer.

Reuters: Study Leaves Women With Conflicting Advice On Mammograms
Controversial U.S. guidelines for mammography issued in 2009, calling for screening every two years rather than annually for women over 50 years old, can result in breast cancers being missed, according to U.S. researchers studying the hotly debated topic. This latest study assessing the impact of revised guidelines issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force three years ago comes on the back of a chilling analysis published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine (Sherman, 11/27).

Modern Healthcare: Studies Question Revised Mammography Guidelines
The revised mammography screening guidelines issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force three years ago may result in missed cancers and declines in screening, according to two studies presented at the Radiological Society of North America's annual meeting this week in Chicago. Both studies looked at changes in mammography screening data following the task force's controversial recommendations in 2009. The U.S. [Preventive] Services Task Force said women should begin routine screening at age 50, instead of age 40. The guidelines also recommended that women undergo routine screening every two years instead of every year and routine screening should end when women are 74 years old (Lee, 11/27).

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