Medicaid Growth In Utah Slows; Arizona Sees Drop in CHIP Beneficiaries

The Salt Lake Tribune: "Utah's Medicaid rolls grew by 405 people in April, the smallest monthly increase since March 2008, the start of an unprecedented growth streak for the low-income health program. Unemployment has also slowed, which economists believe is an early sign of economic recovery" (Stewart, 5/17).

The Arizona Republic: "The number of children participating in Arizona's health-insurance program for working families has dropped dramatically since the state stopped allowing new enrollments in January, according to newly released figures. From Jan. 1 to May 1, enrollments in the KidsCare program plunged more than 26 percent, from 45,820 to 33,708." Much of the decline came through attrition (Rough, 5/15).

Politico: Some former health reform rivals are banding together to create a national nonprofit group that would help put in place some of the health measure's coverage expansions. "PhRMA, the drug manufacturers' trade group, donated $100,000 to the effort, while the American Hospital Association is in for $50,000. Health insurers and other stakeholders in the new law are also contributing to the effort that is aimed at ensuring the millions of people newly eligible for Medicaid and insurance subsidies are able to easily apply and receive those benefits" (Frates, 5/17).

Stateline: "Only Connecticut and the District of Columbia have jumped at the chance to expand Medicaid under the new federal health care law — a move that could save both jurisdictions tens of millions of dollars." Because of the health law, the states have an opportunity to shift low-income people enrolled in state-financed health programs to the Medicaid program, which also gets money from the federal government. The District could save $56 million over four years from the change and Connecticut could save $53 million over 15 months (5/14).

Meanwhile, Politico reports that some former health reform rivals are banding together to create a national nonprofit group that would help put in place some of the health measure's coverage expansions. "PhRMA, the drug manufacturers' trade group, donated $100,000 to the effort, while the American Hospital Association is in for $50,000. Health insurers and other stakeholders in the new law are also contributing to the effort that is aimed at ensuring the millions of people newly eligible for Medicaid and insurance subsidies are able to easily apply and receive those benefits." The group would help people more easily enroll in the new plans (Frates, 5/17).

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