New York Lawmakers Trying To Revive 9/11 Health Care Bill

Lawmakers are trying to bridge the gap between colleagues on the left and right in a bid to provide greater health coverage for 9/11 workers, The Wall Street Journal reports. "The bill was voted down [in the House] late Thursday night amid angry partisan finger-pointing, and now Democratic Rep. Carolyn Maloney and others have begun weighing options to make the bill more tolerable to factions on the right and left. … Already, Democrats are signaling a shift in strategy. Ms. Maloney said that when the House reconvenes in September, she will seek a straight-majority vote. That strategy would have to address the Democrats' underlying fears about such a vote: If given the chance, Republicans will add amendments on immigration and health care that would force the majority to cast tough votes on those issues just two months before the election." Democrats decided for the two-thirds majority vote to stop Republicans from offering such amendments, especially one that would stop 9/11 care payments from being made to illegal immigrants. Lawmakers are also arm-wrestling about how to pay for the $7.4 billion bill in order to attract the majority of votes (Barrett, 8/3).

This is part of Kaiser Health News' Daily Report - a summary of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The full summary of the day's news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.