Today's Selection Of Opinions And Editorials

The Patients Doctors Don’t Know The New York Times
All medical students are required to have clinical experiences in pediatrics and obstetrics, even though after they graduate most will never treat a child or deliver a baby. Yet there is no requirement for any clinical training in geriatrics, even though patients 65 and older account for 32 percent of the average doctor’s workload in surgical care and 43 percent in medical specialty care, and they make up 48 percent of all inpatient hospital days (Rosanne M. Leipzig, 7/1). 

Why It's Easy To Steal From Medicare The Wall Street Journal
One of the purported benefits of nationalized health care is that it will be more efficient than private insurers since it would lack the profit motive and have lower administrative expenses, like Medicare. But one reason entitlement programs are so easy to defraud is precisely because they don't have those overhead costs -- they automatically pay whatever bills roll in with valid claims numbers (7/2).

Doing The Right Thing The Baltimore Sun
Some may insist that Wal-Mart is merely accommodating the politics of the moment and just wants a place at the negotiating table. But the decision also suggests that a company once criticized for its modest benefits and anti-union policies has seen the error of its ways (7/2).

Everyday Low Politics The Wall Street Journal
Corporate America's cheerleading for more government involvement in health care now includes Wal-Mart, that liberal paragon of social irresponsibility. The discount giant's ex-critics probably ought to be more skeptical, given that this seems to be anticompetitive special pleading in progressive drag (7/2).

Detecting a Bad Breast Cancer Bill Roll Call
Feel-good approaches like those offered in Wasserman Schultz’s popular legislation will do more harm than good. No doubt, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s courageous personal story is inspiring. But we shouldn’t mistake her courage for expertise (Jeff Stier, 7/1).

Obama's 5 Health Care Myths Fox News
If you're trying to follow the health care debate, you know there are some "truths" which have been repeated so frequently, and with such vehemence, that they have become gospel. How often have you heard "the costs are skyrocketing" or "our system is broken" or "Americans overwhelmingly support reform"? Here's a heads-up: Some of these are simply baloney (Liz Peek, 7/1).

The Elephant in the Room: Obama's plan? Or yours? The Philadelphia Inquirer
So who would do a better job controlling costs and making the right decisions for your family - you or the government? We know Obama's answer. What's yours? (Rick Santorum, 7/2).

A Public Insurance Plan Will Help Heal A Broken Health Care System New York Daily News
If an effective public option is put forth that makes health care more affordable and accessible for New Yorkers and all Americans, I'll do everything I can to help it become a reality (Michael Bloomberg, 7/2).

New Jersey Sets The Standard For Child Health Care New Jersey Newsroom
Using the tools like Express Lane Eligibility and the additional federal funds offered to states, we can keep our promise to those millions of children, and give them the quality, affordable care they need and deserve. We owe them nothing less (Kathleen Sebelius, 7/1).

This is part of Kaiser Health News' Daily Report - a summary of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The full summary of the day's news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.