Today's Selection Of Opinions And Editorials

Congress's Health Care Numbers Don't Add Up The New York Times
The Congressional Budget Office's integrity is beyond questioning. But the record shows that it has substantially overestimated the cost of health care reform three times out of three. As Congress now works on its greatest push for reform in generations, the budget office needs to revise the methods it uses to make predictions about costs (Jon R. Gabel, 8/25).

More Minority Physicians Needed In Workforce USA Today
African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos and Native Americans together represent 25% of the U.S. population, but only 6% of U.S. physicians. Not coincidentally, racial and ethnic health disparities have remained persistent and actually widened in most categories while the general health of the nation has improved (David Satcher, 8/26).

Health Care And The Democratic Soul Wall Street Journal
Maybe Democrats are afraid it will hurt their standing with those generous fellows on K Street if they channel Harry Truman and say what needs to be said: That government can be made to work for average people. But it will hurt even worse if they refuse to say it (Thomas Frank, 8/25). 

New York Needs National Health Reform Albany Times Union
I urge the House and Senate to work together to pass a health care reform bill that President Barack Obama will sign; one that recognizes the valuable role states play in the delivery, financing and oversight of health care for their residents. Any health bill should recognize the budgetary challenges being faced by states and provide equitable treatment to states that have already significantly expanded Medicaid (David A. Paterson, 8/26). 

Why Obamacare Is Failing The Washington Post
Obama's choices on health care during the next few weeks will determine much about the nature and trajectory of his presidency. Eventually it comes down to a question: Will Obama make necessary strategic adjustments before his political humiliation -- or after it? (Michael Gerson, 8/26).

Women Overlooked In Health Care Debate The Kansas City Star
Women (and men who care about women and our future generations) should be involved in the health care debate currently taking place in Washington, D.C., and there are many reasons why (Jaci Mairs, 8/25).

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