Today's Editorials and Opinions

10 Steps To Better Health Care The New York Times
We have reached a sobering point in our national health-reform debate. Americans have recognized that our health system is bankrupting us and that we have dealt with this by letting the system price more and more people out of health care. So we are trying to decide if we are willing to change — willing to ensure that everyone can have coverage. That means banishing the phrase "pre-existing condition." It also means finding ways to pay for coverage for those who can't afford it without help (Gawande, Berwick, Fisher and McClellan, 8/13).

Americans Aren't Going To Buy Health Care Spin, Mr. President USA Today
But instead of listening to the American people, the president has allowed Speaker Pelosi, the Democratic Congress and special-interest groups to write a bill that puts Washington in control of Americans' health care — something most Americans staunchly oppose (Boehner, 8/13).

The Indefensible Case Against Health Care Reform St. Louis Post-Dispatch
There is plenty of room for reasoned debate about the details. But opponents are relying instead on wild exaggerations and outright falsehoods in their increasingly hysterical attacks (8/13).

A Price To Pay For The Town Hall Rage The Washington Post
Watching the muscular tactics being used in congressional town meetings by some opponents of health-care reform, I keep thinking somebody should remind the Republican leaders who are reveling in the scenes about Bruce Alger (Broder, 8/13).

End Medicare Myths The Honolulu Star-Bulletin
Their concern is based on misinformation, and (Hawaii) Gov. Linda Lingle added to their fear this week in a media conference call. President Barack Obama set her and others straight yesterday and the governor should back away from her unfounded allegations (8/12).

Health Reform And Small Business The New York Times
Republican leaders are doing their best to inflame the fears and opposition of small business owners. These proprietors would be wise to ignore the rhetoric and take a closer look (8/12).

The Health Care Hard Sell The Chicago Tribune
But the town hallers have gleaned enough from news reports and their own homework to discern some genuine problems with Washington's proposals (8/13).

Rationing Away Medical Care The Washington Times
The health care bill in the House of Representatives proposes the creation of a Center for Comparative Effectiveness Research. This new federal bureaucracy would determine what care is supposedly most effective. Patients and doctors should be the ones deciding what care Americans need -- not bureaucrats or the president (8/13).

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